My blog title is a reference to something wonderful. Ask me about it if you're unfamiliar with it!

 

Sometimes I wish I was 29 with my life figured out & sometimes I wish I was 5 with my whole life ahead of me and not a care in the world

Reyna Biddy (via kushandwizdom)

Always wish I was 5. Always.

(via latelygrace)

Pro tip: the 29 year old doesn’t have it all figured out, either.

Do not think that love in order to be genuine has to be extraordinary. What we need is to love without getting tired. Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.

Mother Teresa (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: thresca)

There are friendships I’ve mourned over where too much history got in the way. There were too many harsh words and broken promises and silent disagreements, and it rotted to an impatient grave. But there are others where we traveled the jagged road of reconciliation, mending wounds and untying knots and covering with grace: and on the other end of this is an ocean-deep intimacy of perseverance that couldn’t be reached any other way. We had to wrestle with the ugly parts of our nature. Demons were exposed. Secrets were spilled. Yet there is a joy in this sort of enduring friendship that goes the long distance; there’s a crazy sort of laughter with a lifelong friend that is colored by the weight of heels digging into the ground, a love that says, ‘I’m staying.’ We see it in the cross, and we can have it now, even in a world such as this.

Anonymous asked
It honestly breaks my heart to see you so down. You are such a wonderful person that you don't deserve such bad feelings, ever. (Not that anyone deserves to feel bad, but that's irrelevant at this moment.)

Thank you, kind anon. I’ll be okay, though. God’s given me enough reasons to be happy that it simply won’t do to remain sad for too long. :) I was just very startled by what happened today and thinking on the implications for the future.

Anonymous asked
Aw, I'm sorry. But you don't even think you can try again with the girl you apparently missed your chance with? Second chances happen! Rooting for you, sir.

It’s okay! Life goes on. :)

And no, for the time being, that door is not open to me.

Anonymous asked
Are you doing alright, Matthew? What's going on? Who's this person you feel you missed your chance with? You could get any girl you want, you know. Just saying. <3

Actually, I’ve had better days.

Worse ones, too. I’ll be fine, it’s not the end of me. Besides this stupid wrist, which is, thank God, healing at a remarkable rate, I found out I severely offended some people close to me almost a month ago and that breaks my heart. I had no idea anything had happened, and it frustrates me that no one told me until now.

Also, while I appreciate your thoughtfulness and compassion, I simply do not find your last statement to be true. The problem with it is that the lovely women to whom I am or have been attracted are either in relationships or are not interested in me, or various other extenuating circumstances.

Again, I do appreciate the sentiment! I don’t mean to sound nitpicky. It’s just that, while sweet, it ultimately does not benefit me to believe that I have a chance of dating women with whom I in fact do not. :)

When Jesus first appeared, he appeared to two women, during a time when female testimony was illegitimate, and he asked them to testify to his return. That’s huge – the biggest news in the universe, and two women, whose word was not considered trustworthy, were instructed to carry the news. That, to me, is the most important vision of equality that Christians can have – that is the affirmation that women are equals, that we are valued in the eyes of Christ, that we are necessary to the Gospel story. And that is the lens through which I interpret everything else, as that is the eschatological tale I believe God is weaving.

Dianna Anderson, Ask a Feminist (via yesdarlingido)

(Source: carazuri)

Anonymous asked
I have a slight crush on you. Are you okay 👌 with that?

I don’t know about the “slight” part—go big or go home, right? ;)

No, but really, I appreciate you for saying this! I want everyone to be honest and open with me. I don’t know who you are so I can’t say if I reciprocate, but…yeah. Haha

Ever feel like you had a chance with someone but you missed it? Not that you took it and failed, but you never actually chose that path and you regret it. It sucks, of course.

There are worse things, though! Surely, there are, and the people who think there aren’t are being ridiculous. There are absolutely worse things than missing your chance with someone. 

It’s just that from the moment you realize your chance is gone, every thought of that person will so freshly remind you of your missed opportunity that you may become blind to those other things from time to time.

birdsofrhiannon:

The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. According to legend, the columns are the remains of a causeway built by the Irish giant Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn MacCool) who was challenged to a fight by the Scottish giant Benandonner. Fionn accepted the challenge and built the causeway across the North Channel so that the two giants could meet.

birdsofrhiannon:

The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption.
According to legend, the columns are the remains of a causeway built by the Irish giant Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn MacCool) who was challenged to a fight by the Scottish giant Benandonner. Fionn accepted the challenge and built the causeway across the North Channel so that the two giants could meet.

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"I was seven years old when it happened. It was about 9 pm at night. We heard the neighbors screaming so we knew that the rebels were in the village. There were many people visiting in my house at the time, so all the men gathered in the main room. We had no guns, only knives. Soon the dog started barking, then we heard footsteps, and then we heard a knock on the door. They started calling for my father to come out. We didn’t answer, so they started shooting into the house. Everyone pushed against the door to try to keep it closed, but they knocked it down. My father saw that he couldn’t run, so he gave himself up. They took him away. Then they gathered all the men and boys, and marched us out of the back of the house. My brother tried to jump and climb up on the roof, but they saw him and shot him. I knew I had to try something different, so I waited until we were rounding a corner, and I jumped into a bush, and I kept crawling until I reached the other side, then I got up and ran. I ran all the way to the neighbor’s house, but they turned me away and locked the door. So I hid all night in the graveyard. The next day I returned to my house. They’d taken everything. They dumped my sick mother onto the floor and took her mattress. I found my father’s body in the barn. They’d cut off his arms and his legs.”

(Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” (Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)

You think “One day” this and “one day” that, but you need to focus on this day; because just maybe, that one day will be today.

T.B. LaBerge // Unwritten Letters to You (via tblaberge)

I wait for the day
that choosing me doesn’t feel
like a choice at all.

Daily Haiku on Love by Tyler Knott Gregson (via tylerknott)

Anonymous asked
Mankind invented the telephone in order to text one another. Udderly sinful, udderly.

if systematically dismantling the need for complex valuable social interaction can be disdainfully expressed in a cheesy bovine pun, yes, i agree with you and fully support the moovement to return to our roots